Second Stride in the news





Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event Announces Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance As Official Charity, mentions Second Stride Inc., press release from Rolex Kentucky, December 2015...




FACE OF GLORY, adopted December 2014, is entered in the 2015 $100,000 THOROUGHBRED MAKEOVER COMPETITION for Ranch Work, Trails and will drive in the Freestyle class.

Face of Glory is pictured here at the FIRST THOROUGHBRED MAKEOVER PREVIEW, held at the 2015 Rolex 3-day Event!

Thoroughbred Makeover Sneak Peek Wows Crowds at Rolex, from Eventing Nation, May 2015...






TRIPLE CROWN WINNING JOCKEY & RACING INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS TO ATTEND SECOND STRIDE DERBY FUNDRAISER FOR THOROUGHBREDS, APRIL 2015

GoldMark Media Ventures Presents Jockumentary when Molly Malone’s Hosts 4th Annual Fundraiser

LOUISVILLE, Ky (April 21, 2015).­ Horse racing industry greats Jean Cruguet (Triple Crown jockey, Seattle Slew), Carl Nafzger (trainer, Unbridled), Ed Mussleman (media, Indian Charlie) and many more expected to attend a charity event to begin their Derby weeks, April 27, 2015, 6:00 p.m., at Molly Malone’s Irish Pub, 933 Baxter Avenue, benefiting Second Stride.

Second Stride’s 4th Annual Derby Party and Auction will have a silent and live auction including a range of unique horse racing memorabilia and equine experiences (e.g., a chance to ride horses at Churchill), other ways to fund their mission and an exclusive sneak peak at GoldMark Media Ventures' "jockumentary" film, Heart, Hope, and Glory: Masters of the Triple Crown, featuring Cruguet, Ron Turcotte (Secretariat), and Steve Cauthen (Affirmed). Molly Malone’s will host the event and donate a portion of that day's profits to the organization too.

Since 2010 Second Stride has seen over 400 horses adopted and taking on new roles, competing in dressage, eventing and polo, working as search and rescue horses, ranch cutting horses, lesson horses, trail or pleasure horses.

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About Second Stride Second Stride is 501(c) (3) non­profit providing rehabilitation, retraining, and adoption of retired thoroughbred racehorses since 2005. As a Kentucky certified equine rescue provider, they offer a place for owners to send thoroughbred horses to retire from racing with dignity. Their farm has retraining facilities and services to give racehorses a new career. They have a rigorous adoption process to ensure a Second Stride horse and its new owner are a good match, and the owner’s intended use for the horse suits its health and capabilities.

About Heart, Hope & Glory: Masters of the Triple Crown and GoldMark Media Ventures A jockumentary film that is a tribute to the inspiring stories of three living Triple Crown Jockeys (Turcotte, Cruguet, and Cauthen), paying tribute to the history of the Triple Crown and horse racing. In the making over the last two years it has been independently produced and financed by GoldMark Media Ventures, an extension of GoldMark Farm (GFM) in Ocala, Florida. This film was also created in part to raise awareness for the Permanently Disabled Jockeys Fund and a portion of its proceeds will support the organizations mission. The film is scheduled for release September 2015.






SECOND STRIDE RECEIVES $1,000 GRANT FROM KEENELAND FOUNDATION INC., 2008

CRESTWOOD, Ky. — Second Stride Inc. has been chosen to receive a $1,000 grant from the Keeneland Foundation Inc. The generous donation will be used to pay for labor to build additional permanent stalls at the program’s new location in Henry County. The new 103-acre location is being developed so the program can take in more horses and ensure a safe and quiet environment for their transition from the track into a new career.

“We are honored by being awarded this grant from the Keeneland Foundation. We feel it shows their strong commitment and support to the welfare of horses and horsemen in the racing industry,” said Kim Smith, president of Second Stride.

Second Stride is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit providing professional rehabilitation, retraining and placement of retired thoroughbred racehorses with a goal of ensuring safe, healthy and productive lives after the track. The program specializes in giving retired thoroughbreds the proper care and quality training they need to succeed in something new.

Former Second Stride horses are now competing in dressage, eventing and polo, working as search and rescue horses, ranch cutting horses, lesson horses or trail or pleasure horses.

Since its inception in 2005, Second Stride has placed 86 horses in new homes. In 2008, 22 horses have been placed so far. In addition to helping those horses, many people have benefited by having a great new companion.

Efforts are made to ensure a Second Stride horse and its new owner are a good match, and the owner’s intended use for the horse suits its health and capabilities. Adopters are thoroughly vetted, and Second Stride follows up on horses’ progress to ensure they are continuing to receive quality care.

Second Stride also works with groups such as Pony Club and racehorse owners and trainers to educate people about the needs of retired racehorses. Program horses also have competed in shows while in retraining and appeared at other events to showcase the potential of retired racehorses.

Second Stride relies on donations to continue its work. Now more than ever, it is important for racehorses to have a place to go after the track. The National Thoroughbred Racing Association and industry leaders have proposed a series of sweeping safety and integrity reforms which include improved post-racing care for retired thoroughbreds.

For more information on Second Stride, visit its Web site, www.secondstride.org.

Second Stride follows American Association of Equine Practitioners guidelines on ethical care for horses.






SECOND STRIDE RECEIVES $5,200 GRANT FROM BLUE HORSE CHARITIES, 2008

CRESTWOOD, Ky. — Second Stride Inc. has received a $5,200 grant from Blue Horse Charities that will be used to pay for daily operating expenses and help complete infrastructure at the program’s new 103-acre location in Henry County, Ky.

Daily operating expenses include boarding of Second Stride horses at the program’s current home in Prospect while the new location is completed, as well as care, labor and retraining at both facilities. The generous grant from Blue Horse will help Second Stride take in more horses, and improve the quality of care for the current horses in the program.

“What a generous gift and honor to our program. It made me feel so overwhelmed with emotion to know there are others out there that care as much as we do about the plight of these magnificent ex-racehorses,” said Kim Smith, president of Second Stride. “This is major funding for our grassroots program.”

A portion of the grant also was used to fix the siding on a run-in shed for winter shelter at the Henry County location. The new location will help the program house more horses at one time, and ensure a safe and quiet environment for their transition from the track into a new career.

Second Stride is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit providing professional rehabilitation, retraining and placement of retired thoroughbred racehorses with a goal of ensuring safe, healthy and productive lives after the track. The program specializes in giving retired thoroughbreds the proper care and quality training they need to succeed in something new.

Former Second Stride horses are now competing in dressage, eventing and polo, working as search and rescue horses, ranch cutting horses, lesson horses or trail or pleasure horses.

Since its inception in 2005, Second Stride has placed 86 horses in new homes. In 2008, 22 horses have been placed so far. In addition to helping those horses, many people have benefited by having a great new companion.

Efforts are made to ensure a Second Stride horse and its new owner are a good match, and the owner’s intended use for the horse suits its health and capabilities. Adopters are thoroughly screened, and Second Stride follows up on horses’ progress to ensure they are continuing to receive quality care.

Second Stride also works with groups such as Pony Club and racehorse owners and trainers to educate people about the needs of retired racehorses. Program horses also have competed in shows while in retraining and appeared at other events to showcase the potential of retired racehorses.

Second Stride relies on donations to continue its work. Now more than ever, it is important for racehorses to have a place to go after the track. The National Thoroughbred Racing Association and industry leaders have proposed a series of sweeping safety and integrity reforms which include improved post-racing care for retired thoroughbreds.

For more information on Second Stride, visit its Web site, www.secondstride.org.

Second Stride follows American Association of Equine Practitioners guidelines on ethical care for horses.






SECOND STRIDE RECEIVES $2,700 GRANT FROM ASPCA, 2008

CRESTWOOD, Ky. — Second Stride Inc. has been chosen to receive a $2,700 grant from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA). The generous donation will be used to pay for rubber stall mats at the program’s new location in Henry County to help keep horses safe and healthy.

The 103-acre location is being developed so the program can take in more horses, and ensure a safe and quiet environment for their transition from the track into a new career. The new mats will particularly help horses who come into the program with racing injuries, expediting their recovery while reducing the labor and bedding expenses associated with stall care.

“We are very privileged and honored to have the respect and support of the ASPCA in this way for our program,” said Kim Smith, president of Second Stride.

“The new mats will mean a safer environment for the horses due to the added padding, which helps stimulate leg circulation and reduces the likelihood of bed sores and the buildup of ammonia in stall floors that can aggravate the respiratory tract of a horse sleeping in the stall,” Smith said. “The mats also help to lower the operating overhead by reducing the amount of bedding needed and the amount of labor needed to clean out and re-bed the stalls.”

Second Stride is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit providing professional rehabilitation, retraining and placement of retired thoroughbred racehorses with a goal of ensuring safe, healthy and productive lives after the track. The program specializes in giving retired thoroughbreds the proper care and quality training they need to succeed in something new.

Former Second Stride horses are now competing in dressage, eventing and polo, working as search and rescue horses, ranch cutting horses, lesson horses or trail or pleasure horses.

Since its inception in 2005, Second Stride has placed 86 horses in new homes. In 2008, 22 horses have been placed so far. In addition to helping those horses, many people have benefited by having a great new companion.

Efforts are made to ensure a Second Stride horse and its new owner are a good match, and the owner’s intended use for the horse suits its health and capabilities. Adopters are thoroughly screened, and Second Stride follows up on horses’ progress to ensure they are continuing to receive quality care.

Second Stride also works with groups such as Pony Club and racehorse owners and trainers to educate people about the needs of retired racehorses. Program horses also have competed in shows while in retraining and appeared at other events to showcase the potential of retired racehorses.

Second Stride relies on donations to continue its work. Now more than ever, it is important for racehorses to have a place to go after the track. The National Thoroughbred Racing Association and industry leaders have proposed a series of sweeping safety and integrity reforms which include improved post-racing care for retired thoroughbreds.

For more information on Second Stride, visit its Web site, www.secondstride.org.

Second Stride follows American Association of Equine Practitioners guidelines on ethical care for horses.






SECOND STRIDE RECEIVES $1,000 GRANT FROM THOROUGHBRED CHARITIES OF AMERICA, 2008

CRESTWOOD, Ky. — Second Stride Inc. has been chosen from over 200 applicants to receive a $1,000 grant from Thoroughbred Charities of America. This generous grant will be used to provide retraining of retired thoroughbred racehorses to help them transition into a new career.

“We are honored to qualify for this generous grant from the Thoroughbred Charities of America,” said Kim Smith, president of Second Stride. “The TCA is a driving force behind the welfare of the racing thoroughbred. Their funding helps make it possible to expand the level of training and care of the horses in our program.”

The money helped the program take in two colts whose owners were in financial distress and who most other retraining programs would have denied because the two had not been gelded, Smith said. With the donation, Second Stride was able to geld both and start them under saddle.

Second Stride is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit providing professional rehabilitation, retraining and placement of retired thoroughbred racehorses with a goal of ensuring safe, healthy and productive lives after the track. The program specializes in giving retired thoroughbreds the proper care and quality training they need to succeed in something new.

Former Second Stride horses are now competing in dressage, eventing and polo, working as search and rescue horses, ranch cutting horses, lesson horses or trail or pleasure horses.

Since its inception in 2005, Second Stride has placed 86 horses in new homes. In 2008, 22 horses have been placed so far. In addition to helping those horses, many people have benefited by having a great new companion.

Efforts are made to ensure a Second Stride horse and its new owner are a good match, and the owner’s intended use for the horse suits its health and capabilities. Adopters are thoroughly vetted, and Second Stride follows up on horses’ progress to ensure they are continuing to receive quality care.

Second Stride also works with groups such as Pony Club and racehorse owners and trainers to educate people about the needs of retired racehorses. Program horses also have competed in shows while in retraining and appeared at other events to showcase the potential of retired racehorses.

Second Stride is in the process of completing infrastructure on a new, 103-acre location in Henry County, Ky., to help the program house more horses at one time, and ensure a safe and quiet environment for their transition from the track into a new career.

Second Stride relies on donations to continue its work. Now more than ever, it is important for racehorses to have a place to go after the track. The National Thoroughbred Racing Association and industry leaders have proposed a series of sweeping safety and integrity reforms which include improved post-racing care for retired thoroughbreds.

For more information on Second Stride, visit its Web site, www.secondstride.org.

Second Stride follows American Association of Equine Practitioners guidelines on ethical care for horses.




from State-Journal.com

Brass Hat ready to run with Curlin

Brass Hat faces a tough challenge in his next race, but his trainer says he's ready for it.

The 7-year-old gelding, owned and bred by Fred Bradley and trained by Buff Bradley, will run in the $1 million, Grade I Stephen Foster Handicap Saturday at Churchill Downs.

Also entered in the 10-horse field is Curlin, reigning Horse of the Year.

"He's doing very well," Buff Bradley said about Brass Hat. "He's ready to run. He likes this track. He has the track record for a mile and 1/16 on this track.

"I know this is Curlin's home track, too," he added, "but Brass is running well. Whether he's good enough to pass Curlin I don't know, but I know he'll be running with him."

Post positions were drawn Wednesday. Brass Hat will break from the No. 10 post while Curlin will start on the rail. Curlin is currently the favorite at 3-5 while Einstein and Grasshopper are both at 5-1. Brass Hat is the fourth choice at 8-1.

Brass Hat's last race was the Louisville Handicap at Churchill May 24, a turf race covering 1 miles.

"He was a fast-closing fourth," Bradley said. "He was too far back early, and there was a slow pace to boot. He came back in that race. His last two races he didn't get the best of trips."

Prior to the Louisville Handicap, Brass Hat ran in the Elkhorn, a 1-mile turf race April 25 at Keeneland where he finished third.

"He had a horrible wide trip in that race," Bradley said.

On Saturday Calvin Borel will ride Brass Hat for the second straight time.

"Calvin's been working him out every time," Bradley said. "He's ridden him one time in a race, and he took full responsibility for being too far back with a slow pace last time. He knows him better this time.

"And there will be some pace in this race," Bradley added. "It'll be a much different race than the last race, besides being on dirt."

Brass Hat has run in the Stephen Foster one other time, finishing fifth in 2006. Borel won the Foster that year aboard 91-1 long shot Seek Gold.

Bradley isn't concerned about starting from the outside in this year's Foster.

"I'm thinking there could be a scratch or two and we could move closer," he said, "and Calvin is one of the best at moving inside and saving ground. I'd rather be at 10 than 1, I'll put it that way."

Brass Hat is a multiple-graded stakes winner who's earned more than $1 million, but he faces a tough field Saturday. Einstein is a Grade I stakes winner, and Sam P. ran in last year's Kentucky Derby, finishing ninth. He'll be ridden by Kent Desormeaux Saturday.

Then there's Curlin, trained by Steve Asmussen and ridden by Robby Albarado.

"Curlin has looked outstanding all spring," Bradley said. "I've watched him work out. I still wouldn't trade places with them because I love my horse, and people love him, too.

"We're going to give him a run for the money," he added, "but we'll have to earn that money."

Brass Hat and Perfect Drift are squaring off again with authentic shoes worn by each horse, up for auction on www.Ebay.com, head to head. All proceeds will benefit Second Stride horses, a not-for-profit organization to benefit retired thoroughbred race horses.Go to www.secondstride.org and click on each horse's name to bid.




The Louisville Courier Journal

April 27, 2008

Retired thoroughbreds given fresh start

What happens to racehorses after they cross the finish line for the last time?

Attention has increased recently on the plight of retired thoroughbreds who were not big winners and weren't needed for breeding. Some are retired to farms where they are well cared for, but there are stories of others being neglected or sold for slaughter.

Kim Smith's Second Stride Inc., a nonprofit adoption organization for retired thoroughbreds, is helping write new beginnings for some horses long after the last call to the post.

"I adore the sport of racing, and I believe these horses are bred for it and love it," Smith said. "We believe that most horsemen who work with them are inherently good people … but a lot of them just don't have any context for where to send them."

Many smaller trainers whose horses become ineligible for racing must remove the animals from track stalls on short notice and sometimes have no place to send them and no time to locate someone willing to adopt, Smith said. Such horses are often placed with Second Stride, on Moserwood Farms in Oldham and Henry counties.

"We want to be there to help them transition with a little dignity while they're physically able to move on to their next career," Smith said. "Most of them don't enjoy just being idle in the field. They thrive on a routine."

Within a few weeks of arriving at Second Stride, horses begin retraining for use in three-day eventing, dressage or other competition. They get identification numbers for tracking, and stallions are gelded. Adoption fees generally range upward of $400.

"I had a Storm Cat colt out of a Breeder's Cup mare that we placed with a North Carolina fella who does search and rescue," Smith said. "It was perfect for this horse, because he hated repetition and that's something new every day."

Another retired racehorse is being used as a cutting horse for cattle. His new owner said the small thoroughbred was well-suited for the work because of his speed and agility.

Rachel Logsdon, who lives near Lexington, said her adopted thoroughbred, Max, is "becoming quite the dressage boy," although he prefers jumping.

"He's so fun to ride, with the way he holds his head so high, and his canter is so great," she said. "I get lost in the rhythm of it sometimes and forget where to go."

About 70 retired thoroughbreds have come through Second Stride during the past 2½ years.

Second Stride operates through private fundraising, some help from equine-related charities, adoption fees, public donations and more than a few dollars out of Smith's own pocket, her friends say.

Check out www.secondstride.org.

Byron Crawford's column appears on Sundays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Reach him at (502) 582-4791 or bcrawford@courier-journal.com. Comment on this column, and read previous columns, at www.courier-journal.com/byron.





Second Stride for retired racers - rehabilitation and retrained horses available for adoption

2007, by Kathryn Jacewicz, Staff writer and photographer

No more fast speed on the track, loud crowds or money bets. Retired racehorses now rest on a quiet, peaceful farm in Pleasureville, where they will be rehabilitated, retrained, and adopted.

Second Stride is a non-profit organization that takes retired race horses and gives them a chance at a second career in dressage, jumping, or just trail and companion use.

Second Stride President Kim Smith said her interest in horses began at age 7, when she got her first pony.

"I grew up having to take free horses and make them racing horses," she said.

Smith is a Kentucky licensed thoroughbred trainer and full time manager of Moserwood Farms in Prospect, which provides broodmare management and also helps place Second Stride Horses.

Smith said when rehabilitating and retraining horses, they start from scratch.

"We act like they've never been ridden," Smith said. "We use the round pen a lot to get them going."

The horses are rehabilitated and retrained, as many are right off the track and are not used to being around many people.

In the pen, horses are taught track words, such as walk, trot and cantor. Once the horses are ready to begin jumping, they are moved to the location in Prospect, where they are trained in an indoor ring.

"The horses get a nice, solid start," Smith said.

Once the training and rehabilitation are complete, the horses are ready for adoption. Smith said they do adopt to resale homes, as she finds them to be some of the best homes.

"A lot of trainers that show sell them and come back and get more," she said. "For a qualified home, most often it's a trainer."

Second Stride has adopted out 12 horses this year, although Smith said she has helped hundreds of horses get adopted since she started working for Internet horse agencies in 1995.

"Using the Internet, we've been doing great," she said.

Most clients will adopt the horses sight-unseen, and Smith tried to provide as much information on the web site as possible.

"Our goal is to know as much about these horses as we can," she said. "We haven't run into any yet that haven't been placed."

Adoption fees range from $300 - $1,200, and cover much of the past expense of the horse. Smith said it costs approximately $10 a day to feed a horse, and an estimated $25 a month for vet, farrier and boarding costs.

Second Stride does have many friends who donate to the cause, but Smith said there is not enough funding to cover all the horses.

"It comes back to me, my pockets," she said. "We're doing pretty good right now, and we're close to covering the fees."

Because of cost, Smith tries to keep four horses at a time, although the number often fluctuates. Second Stride currently has six horses in the program.

"People just keep giving me horses," she said. "There's such a need for the horsemen. They want to do the right thing."

Because of the lack of funding, Second Stride does not take horses in need of major medical attention, although Smith hopes to be able to do so in the future.

Smith said 75 percent of Second Stride's horses are in Pleasureville, and she hopes to one day have all of them in Henry County.

"We've been thrilled to be in Henry County," she said. "It's so peaceful, and you see a big difference when you bring them out here."

Smith said the equine community has been very helpful to her, and in return, she supports the local businesses as much as possible. She contracts drivers to deliver horses, her veterinarian and farrier are in county, and she works with local construction agencies on barn and land repairs.

"I love to support local if I can," she said.

Second Stride operates with a board of directors, a full-time grounds keeper and trainer, although Smith hopes to hire a full-time administrative assistant when funding allows. She currently does most of the clerical work, Internet postings, and advertisements by herself.

"I'd love to be out with the horses more," she said.

Second Stride is always willing to accept donations and help from volunteers. Those wanting to help with clerical work, horse brushing, or odd jobs can contact Smith at (502) 228-7085. Additional information can be found at www.secondstride.org.

"The more the horses are around people, it helps," she said.

E-mail us about this article at news@hclocal.com.